Dyslexia Management

Children diagnosed with Dyslexia could have visual problems, and these children may respond well to visual treatments such as eyeglasses, vision therapy or precision tinted lenses.

Dyslexia Management

Children diagnosed with Dyslexia could have visual problems, and these children may respond well to visual treatments such as eyeglasses, vision therapy or precision tinted lenses.

Research has indicated that up to 15% of the population may be Dyslexic, but fewer than one in ten are actually identified and receive a formal diagnosis.

Some people with unidentified Dyslexia will overcome early difficulties, but for the majority, learning difficulties will likely persist and have lifelong consequences for their occupations and career paths.

All children and adults who are reading or learning underachievers require a detailed evaluation of visual function, especially of the binocular vision system, even if a formal diagnosis of Dyslexia has been made.

Binocular vision problems, such as eye teaming coordination and focusing difficulties, often occur with or can be mistaken for Dyslexia.

These symptoms can be successfully treated with a customised program of vision therapy. Therefore, a comprehensive binocular eye exam is recommended before diagnosing a patient with Dyslexia.

Visual stress due to hyper-excitability in the part of the brain known as the visual cortex can be quite prevalent in Dyslexia, causing visual distortions and illusions. Precision tinted lenses can often result in a remarkable improvement in symptoms.

No two people with Dyslexia are alike; each person has individual strengths and weaknesses. It is important to remember that not all people with Dyslexia have the same problems with reading, learning or schoolwork.

Scientific research has found that there could be one or more (up to 50) affected sites in the brain that cause Dyslexia. Each site can affect the brain in different ways, causing multiple and often confusing manifestations of Dyslexia.

Most people with Dyslexia develop coping strategies (e.g., avoiding reading). People with Dyslexia may have a wide range of talents, such as art, drama, math and sports, but memory or organisation may be challenging for them.